WiFi encryption standards

There are three commonly-used standards of Wi-Fi AP security in the world today. The best known, Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), is readily vulnerable to exploits and must not be trusted except for the flimsiest of protection. WEP is widely considered to be a trivial barrier to even barely competent hackers, and to afford only a bare minimum of protection on its own.

Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) was developed as an intermediate solution to the revelation that WEP’s encryption had been highly compromised. The second generation of WPA security is called WPA2, and this is the current state of the art. WPA2 delivers (to date) very good encryption and protection against eavesdropping. WPA2 Personal provides strong encryption and uses Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP), which dynamically encrypts the key used for authentication. WPA2 Enterprise uses an authentication server to authenticate users.

Until recently, implementing WPA and WPA2 was something of a hassle; if you’ve been wireless for some time now, and still have Wireless B Cards (see sidebar), you’ll have challenges using WPA. If you have fairly new equipment, such as an Intel Centrino notebook, you’ll be able to use at least WPA if not WPA2.


Also in this series…
A proposal for Reasonable Wireless Security for law firms

A sample network access policy

Wifi encryption standards

“There’s nothing on my desk worth stealing”

…and free hotspots for all